Every region of France has its own particular cheese. Back in the time of General de Gaulle, France had 246 types of cheese. Now it has quite a few more, given the large number of new products and recipes that have emerged from France’s hundreds of dairy companies in the past 20 years. The main families of French Cheeses are as below, we have only described the types of cheese we sell in Le Chalet.

Brie

Description

There are two sorts of Brie, Brie de Meaux and Brie de Melun, both appellation controlled (AOC) cheeses named after two towns in the the country some fifty miles South East of Paris. Brie comes as a thin round cheese about 20 inches in diameter, with a soft white crust. This crust is eaten, not cut off. Brie is a very mild creamy cheese that should appeal to anyone who does not enjoy strong tasting cheese.

Camembert

Description

A cheese from Normandy, Camembert is perhaps the most famous French cheese, and is known and imitated worldwide. A ripe Camembert should be just soft on the inside, but not too runny. The crust of a Camembert is usually eaten.

Croittin de Chavignol

Description

A small individual goat cheese, white in appearance having no rind, ideal in cooking, especially starters. The cheese comes from the Loire region of France

Munster

Description

A fairly strong rind-washed soft cheese from the Vosges mountains in Eastern France, in the Lorraine region. It has a strong smell when ripe, with a nutty, spicy flavour.

Morbier

Description

It is ivory colored, soft and slightly elastic, and is immediately recognizable by the black layer of tasteless ash separating it horizontally in the middle. It has a rind that is yellowish, moist, and leathery. The aroma of Morbier is strong, but the flavour is rich and creamy, with a slightly bitter after taste. The ash is supposed to aid digestion.

Pont L'Eveque

Description

Pont-l'eveque is an uncooked, unpressed cow's-milk cheese, square in shape weighing approx. 400g. The central pate is soft, creamy pale yellow in colour with a smooth, fine texture and a pungent aroma. This is surrounded by a washed rind that is white with a orange-brown colouration.

Vignotte

Description

This young cheese is creamy and mild with a hint of lemon. it has a soft texture and is popular on French cheeseboard selections.

Comte

Description

This delicious French cousin of the Swiss "Gruyere" cheese is an appellation controlled from the Franche Comt頠region of Eastern France. The production area stretches along the Swiss border, and all milk comes from cows grazing at at least 400 metres altitude. This cooked cheese is manufactured collectively village by village, and the production method has changed little over hundreds of years.

Emmental

Description

Emmental is your traditional French cheese with holes in it. It is not an appellation controlee cheese, and is thus produced over a large area of France, notably in the East.

Roquefort

Description

The famous ewes milk cheese, matured in caves reputedly the source of Roquefort penicillium the airborne spore which develops the characteristic green and blue veining in the cheese.